How to spy on your leopard gecko

When I first got my leopard geckos I had so much anxiety… Why weren’t they eating? Was one gecko hogging all the food? Do they ever leave their hot hide? Are they shedding easily? Do they bully each other?

So many questions I couldn’t answer because of them being diurnal/ nocturnal, and also because they were very shy and tended to hide when I was around.

So my solution? Buy a camera to spy on them, of course!

As you’ll know if you follow my Instagram (@leopardgeckocare) I post a lot of my leopard geckos’ night time activity which comes directly from my “GeckoCam.”

Here’s a bit about the camera I use…

Zmodo True HD Mini WiFi Wireless Wide Angle Indoor Home Video Security Camera Two-Way Audio, Cloud Service Available

It’s by Zmodo and called the Mini Wifi Cam. I bought mine from Amazon (link above) for £34.99.

IMG_1224It connects to an app on your phone which is called MeShare (iOS and Android), and you can watch a live stream from wherever you are once it’s connected to your wifi network.

My favourite thing about it is that it has a day AND a night mode, so you can see your reptiles even in darkness. It will automatically switch between the different modes based on the lighting conditions.

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My second favourite thing is that it has a motion and sound sensor, so if there is motion or sound, you can instruct the app to alert you whenever there is movement or sound. It will also save a couple of screenshots showing the event that caused the sound/ movement. I switch the sound sensor off, as my leos don’t make any noise, and it just picks up background noise which serves me no purpose.

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Another great feature which isn’t needed for my leos but would be great if you had a dog, for example, is that you can speak into the app and your voice will come out of a speaker in the camera.

I had loads of trouble getting the app and camera connected to my wifi network, but the Zmodo pages were really good at helping me troubleshoot and eventually get it up and running.

The app itself is really easy to use, with a nice interface. You can watch a live stream, it will automatically store all motion-triggered screen shots for 36 hours, you can share the camera footage with other people who have the app, etc.

Getting one of these cameras would be great if:

  • you’re worried that your leopard gecko’s aren’t eating
  • you’re worried that there’s bullying happening
  • you go away for a few nights and need to make sure they’re ok
  • if they have shedding issues

My one reservation about these cameras is I don’t know if Infared light can be seen by leopard geckos, and there’s also a small blue light on the front, so I only use this camera occasionally, and I try to avoid shining it into their favourite hide.

Have you tried using cameras to spy on your pets? Comment below 🙂

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Meet my leopard geckos!

It seems logical that my first post should be about my two pet geckos, so let me introduce you to Charizard and Nim. 

I have wanted some leopard geckos since childhood, and since I bought my own apartment at the beginning of the year, there is nobody stopping me from keeping reptiles and their live food in my home!

At the end of July I decided I was ready to buy them, so I did all my research (or so I thought – there was still so much to learn!) bought my vivarium and equipment, and found a great breeder on Gumtree, who was happy to talk to me on the phone, answer any questions etc. We then arranged for me to go and meet her the next day to see the geckos. I initially only wanted one, but fell in love with two of them, so I left her house with two baby leos.

Here’s Charizard (yes, I named him after a Pokemon). He was born on May 13th 2017. I’m not an expert on Leopard Gecko morphs, but after reading online I am quite confident that he’s a tremper albino, or something similar. He looks a little more pale than usual here as he was about to shed his skin.

Baby leopard gecko

This one is called Nim, she was born on June 13th 2017, so is exactly a month younger than Charizard, and I think she could possibly be a mack snow morph. If anybody knows about morphs, I’d really love to know what they both are.

leopard gecko care